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Robin's Blog Archives - Robin Pomeroy | Professional Triathlete

Running with Sensoria

Sensoria Smart Socks and Bluetooth Anklets – Running ‘Smart’ (http://www.sensoriafitness.com/) I have been a runner almost my entire life. I ran when I was a kid for fun, then continued this passion to run in high school and college. Collegiate running was tough on my body as I found myself injured with a femoral stress fracture nearly every season. After college, I took a break from running for about 2 years as I bike raced and dabbled in triathlon. I continued my education and went to UW-Milwaukee to pursue an MS in Biomechanics, an interest that stemmed from my history in running injuries. I studied foot kinematics in runners with and without plantar fasciitis, as well as other injuries. With this degree, I started to become much more aware of my own running kinematics and realized that the root of my collegiate running injuries might have come from improper biomechanics. Post grad studies, I started to ramp up my running again as I started to pick up triathlon more seriously. I didn’t want to get injured again so was still very cautious. I started to race triathlon professionally in 2015, still holding my running mileage and intensity back while slowly increasing my mileage over time. Flash forward a couple of years, in May 2017, I fractured my clavicle on a training ride. This forced me to take a break from all things training for several weeks. I stopped running for a good solid 3 weeks, but tried to keep some aerobic conditioning up by power walking before slowly getting back into the running.  I was nervous about being away...

Challenge Kanchanaburi

After taking a bit of a hiatus from training and really anything to do with triathlon, I want to revisit my last race of the season: Challenge Kanchanaburi! Thailand in mourning It is noteworthy to mention what happened in Thailand just a week before the race. The Thai king passed away October 13th at the age of 88 after ruling for 70 years. He was well liked by many in the country, especially the countryside. There are different mourning periods: The first is 30 days, then there is a 100 day period, and finally a full year when the burial and coronation occur. Due to all of this most sporting events (and other events) were canceled throughout the country; however, the Challenge Kanchanaburi staff worked very hard to make this race happen. As part of the mourning period, the government mandated that everything be black and white. So everyone was wearing black/white/gray shirts, TV channels were in black and white, and many websites switched to black and white. The race needed to get all of their red Challenge banners reprinted to be black and white in order to hold the race. So many last minute changes and behind-the-scene logistics were dealt with that we didn’t see. I was super impressed with the race staff for delivering a phenomenal race but also for showing full respect for the king.   Onto the race! The Mida resort we stayed at was absolutely beautiful. It was fun to just hang out with the racers and organizers prior to the event and meet the athletes as they came in throughout the week since...
Hefei 70.3 Race Report

Hefei 70.3 Race Report

I was excited about the opportunity to race in China when this race first came out. I took a nice recovery week after Timberman in August, then went into a high volume training block. I raced frequently during the season so I didn’t have time to build in a training block like this. I knew I was going into this race in great shape, but I also knew there were so many unknowns I would be dealing with, including jetlag. I did what I could to get adjusted and gave myself the best possible chance to do well, but I took pressure off by knowing this race was a little bit of an experiment. Plus with Brian going, we thought it would be a great place to spend our anniversary! The support here was amazing. Ironman did a great job at this inaugural race, and the Chinese soaked up the experience! Roads (2-3 full lanes) for the bike course were fully closed and there were 15,000 security guards and over 90km of fencing along the bike course. Swim was in Swam Lake, which was a shuttle ride away from the hotel that most athletes were staying in. The second transition zone was in Wanda Park, where the hotel district was. Swan Lake was a nice body of water to swim in given the circumstances and was very spectator-friendly, bringing hundreds of spectators to watch. Nearly 2,000 athletes were competing, and over half of them were first-timers! There was also a large percentage of age groupers there who were gunning for a Kona slot. We had quite the mix of...
Living with Celiac Disease as a Professional Triathlete

Living with Celiac Disease as a Professional Triathlete

As a professional athlete with celiac disease, it has been a long learning process to be healthy and strong. And not an easy one. When I was diagnosed with celiac 12 years ago and went on a gluten free diet, I thought I would see major improvements and that my body would feel better quickly. Following that diagnosis though, I had multiple stress fractures in my hips as I pursued my goals of running in college. I decided to take a hiatus from running in 2007 to allow my body to fully heal because I figured I was just in a vicious injury cycle I needed to escape from. My injuries healed and I felt stronger, but I wasn’t testing my body like I used to in competitive running. I dabbled in triathlon for the next few years and thought I was staying healthy because I wasn’t getting injured. When I started to compete in triathlon more seriously in 2013, I fractured the 3rd metatarsal in my foot during a race at the end of the season. It was frustrating because even though it was my first injury since 2007, it was also the first time I had picked up my running volume and intensity to be able to perform at a higher level. I was determined to figure out what was going on more aggressively. I met with a couple of doctors, had blood work and a DEXA scan done. Nothing seemed abnormal. I met with my sports dietician, Sheila Leard of My Nutrition Zone, and had a micronutrient test done. This revealed a LOT of deficiencies that...

Changes in gluten free products

When I was diagnosed with Celiac in 2004, there were very limited options of gluten free food and a lack of knowledge of Celiac Disease and what it meant to be gluten free. I would travel to restaurants with my own pasta noodles and ask that they boil them in a separate pot and put some marinara and meat sauce on them so I could eat with the rest of my family/friends. Sandwich bread was crumbly, small and very dense. There was no such thing as gluten free all-purpose flour, so if I wanted to make anything using gluten-free flour, I had to make everything from scratch – using a combination of corn flour, brown rice flour, tapioca starch, potato starch, xanthan gum, and the list goes on! I had 10 bags of different gluten free flours opened at a time. Every day I would figure out what I could NOT eat, and there was nothing being added to my COULD eat list. My options were limited and were not healthy alternatives to its gluten-filled substitute. It was very frustrating to say the least. Years later, “gluten free” started to become well known. Heck, people started eating gluten free because of potential health benefits. More and more people were going on gluten free diets. More companies were making gluten free foods, and GOOD food. I can now guarantee that there will be Udi’s gluten free bread in almost any grocery store, restaurants have gluten free pizza options with Udi’s gluten free crusts, and menus have a separate gluten free section. No longer did I need to bring my own...

Texas 70.3 Race Report

I was excited to start the season with this race. I developed some good off-season fitness and was looking forward to putting that to a test, along with everyone else! I had a year of racing the half distance under my belt, so I was much more comfortable with racing the distance. I combined the trip with some good family time, visiting my brother-in-law and future sister-in-law! We had a blast getting a great tour of Johnson Space Center. I was able to see the NBL but at 86-degrees, it was a bit too warm to swim in! We explored some training mockups of the ISS and got to see the historic mission control where Apollo 11, 13 and others were controlled as well as visit the current space station mission control. Definitely the highlight of the weekend! As for the race, things did not go as planned the day before because I had some bike issues and didn’t have my normal prep routine. I felt pretty rusty since I haven’t raced in several months.. or put my wetsuit on in as much time! But I put all that aside and focused only on the positives and the good preparation I have had all winter. Swim I knew the swim start would be a bit chaotic with 30+ women starting. I didn’t quite have the best start, and couldn’t get settled until about half way, when I found myself with a small group. The water was nice and course was very easy to follow. No problems, just the normal first race of the season issues. It was great to...